Difference between revisions of "Higher Order Logic"

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(Created page with "{{definition}} {{Reference_Definition| A logic is called higher order if it allows sets to be quantified or if it allows sets to be elements of other sets. Higher Order Logic...")
 
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{{Reference_Definition| A logic is called higher order if it allows sets to be quantified or if it allows sets to be elements of other sets.  Higher Order Logics becomes relevant when dealing with modalities, such as certainty or necessity. | McMaseter University web site}}
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{{Reference_Definition| A logic is called higher order if it allows sets to be quantified or if it allows sets to be elements of other sets.  Higher Order Logics becomes relevant when dealing with modalities, such as certainty or necessity. | [http://www.cas.mcmaster.ca/~lawford/2F03/Notes/HOL.pdf McMaster University web site]}}
  
 
{{Seealso| First Order Predicate Logic}}
 
{{Seealso| First Order Predicate Logic}}
 
{{kindof|Information Model}}
 
{{kindof|Information Model}}
 
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{{Glossary Entry}}

Revision as of 22:01, 13 February 2012


Definition:
Reference Definition: A logic is called higher order if it allows sets to be quantified or if it allows sets to be elements of other sets. Higher Order Logics becomes relevant when dealing with modalities, such as certainty or necessity. ([[source:: McMaster University web site]])


See also: First Order Predicate Logic
Category: Information Model